[bible:365] Days 8-10 – Genesis 35-50

I love the Joseph story (and it’s various retellings. Technicolor Dreamcoat anybody?). It’s always been a particular favorite of mine, seeing how God uses one man to impact so many people, even though things don’t always seem to go well for him.

I can’t imagine what it would have felt like to be him: to be sold into slavery by your own brothers. The sense of abandonment he must have felt, and yet he never turns away from God. Then, to go from rock bottom as a slave in a foreign country to being household overseer for an important man, only to have it all taken away from him when he did nothing wrong. I can’t believe I ever complain about my circumstances. continue reading…

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[bible:365] Day 7 – Genesis 31-35

Our heros are not perfect.

These people, those we herald as the “heroes of the faith” were not perfect: they had very real flaws, made very real (and often disastrous) mistakes, and did not follow God perfectly.

This is something that I have noticed throughout Scripture, but it really stood out to me in today’s reading.¬†Honestly, it’s one of the most comforting themes I see in Scripture: that those extolled for their faith were not perfect.

In this reading, Jacob does not trust that God will take care of him. God has promised Jacob blessings and¬†descendants, and tells Jacob he will be with him as he returns to the land of his father (21:3). But despite this, Jacob is fearful of Laban, continue reading…

[bible:365] Day 6 – Genesis 26-30

It’s pretty neat to see how God reaffirms his covenant with Isaac in the beginning of chapter 26. Abraham has died, so now the covenant has been passed to Isaac, of which God reminds him. God reveals himself to the next generation and passes on the covenant again in chapter 28 with Jacob.

I grew up in a Christian family, so God and church was my life. But really, my faith wasn’t mine; it was the faith of my parents, and I was living it because it was the thing to do, and there were no other real options at that age. But the summer before eight grade, continue reading…